The Grayling Lecture – Brexit: The Next Steps in the Fight Against it

The Grayling lecture “Brexit: The next Steps in the Fight Against It“, will be on Saturday 21 April from 6.15 at New Beacon School Sevenoaks.

Professor Grayling is a committed Remainer and has spoken and written  extensively about why people voted to leave the European Union and why the UK should not do so.

There is more about Professor Grayling on his website.

After the lecture, Professor Grayling will take questions.

There will then be a Question Time Panel discussion on “Brexit and Kent – The Law, Trade, our NHS and the Young Voter“. There has been no Impact Assessment of the likely or potential effects of Brexit on Kent and it is high time we are more informed on this.

The Panellists will be:

  • Hugh Mercer QC – Barrister
  • Dick Dunmore – Former scholar of Peterhouse Cambridge and a distinguished transport consultant.
  • Dr Carlo Berti – South East Coast Regional Council Executive member and a Consultant in Kent.
  • Madeleina Kay – Musician, author, political activist and campaigner.


Tickets are £7.50 / £2.50 for under 26s, and can be bought in advance here. Continue reading “The Grayling Lecture – Brexit: The Next Steps in the Fight Against it”

Sevenoaks people very receptive to SSTIE’s NHS campaign

Today there were 21 people on the streets of Sevenoaks campaigning on the NHS and standing together with the 1DWU (1 Day Without Us ) national campaign in support of migrants.

SSTIE Members & supporters gathering signatures to support the NHS in Sevenoaks

Hundreds of EM Euratom petition leaflets were distributed along with many of SSTIE’s new leaflet inviting people to join us along with a couple of hundred 1DWU leaflets.

57 signatures were gathered in 2 hours for the Euratom petition demanding that the UK stay in Euratom.

SSTIE on the streets of Sevenoaks


Cancer Isotope Supply Concerns – An Issue For Swanley Shoppers

On 27 th January 2018, 16 members of SSTIE (affiliated to the European Movement) campaigned in Swanley speaking to hundreds of Swanley shoppers on the issue of EURATOM, which is the EU agency that oversees, among other things, the supply of isotopes to the NHS for cancer diagnoses.

There were a number of signatories supporting the European Movement petition to the government that the UK should continue to be a member of Euratom after Brexit as we do not have a reactor capable of producing these isotopes.

600 leaflets on the Euratom petition and hundreds of SSTIE’s own leaflet were accepted by Swanley shoppers.

On the general issue of the EU most people in Swanley seemed to take the view that things will work out in the end. They were quite philosophic about it and were heard to say we managed fine before and we’ll manage fine once we are out. At the same time a number were prepared to read and consider our views.

It was interesting to see the extent of support for Remain among the local Labour party people who were also out campaigning on the NHS and with whom a number of us had very positive contacts.
All in all it was a positive campaign and this encourages to return to Swanley which we will do later this spring.

The Cambridge Brexit Report (published 28’th April 2017)

The Cambridge Brexit Report is a collaboration between Cambridge for Europethe Cambridge University European Society, The Wilberforce Society, Polygeia, and Cambridge Stays. It was commissioned by Daniel Zeichner MP, and is the second part of a project that began with a Conference on 24 February, entitled Cambridge and Brexit: Discussing our Future. This Conference brought together more than 100 Cambridge community members across the political spectrum in a series of presentations and discussions about the implications of Brexit on various sectors. Both the Conference and the Report seek to understand how we can work together in mapping the way forward for Britain after Brexit, and integrate both local and national perspectives.

The Cambridge Brexit Report consists of twelve chapters, covering the Economy, Trade and Business, the Pharmaceutical Industry, Creative Industries, Agriculture, Universities and Research, Freedom of Movement and Immigration, the Constitution, Devolution and the Regions, Human Rights, the Environment, and the NHS. Each has its own approach, structure, and conclusions.


These two recommendations cut across all chapters:

  1. The vote to leave the European Union has created uncertainty as to the United Kingdom’s future; all should be done to dispel such uncertainty as soon as possible, for it proves damaging to business, investment plans, research projects, life decisions, etc.
  2. Brexit will be a momentous transition for the United Kingdom, opening up a range of opportunities in a number of fields. This Report puts forward the concerns, hopes, and recommendations of the Greater Cambridge community; other communities across the country should be offered a similar opportunity to have their say. What was achieved by a team of volunteers in Cambridge could easily be achieved by local and central government on a larger scale; we therefore recommend that the Government launch public consultations in cities and towns all over the UK, and rely on the resulting reports to inform its Brexit negotiations and policies.

The Cambridge Brexit Report

Introduction & Executive Summary

Chapter I: The Economy

Chapter II: Trade and Business

Chapter III: The Pharmaceutical Industry

Chapter IV: Creative Industries

Chapter V: Agriculture

Chapter VI: Universities and Research

Chapter VII: Freedom of Movement and Immigration

Chapter VIII: The Constitution

Chapter IX: Devolution and the Regions

Chapter X: Human Rights

Chapter XI: The Environment & Climate Change

Chapter XII: The NHS


NHS Funding Pledge Petition

Pay £350m per week to NHS or re-run EU Referendum

The only slogan on the side of the Leave EU campaign bus stated in large letters that if we left the EU, £350m per week could go to the NHS. The government has now stated that this will not happen so the reason thousands voted for Brexit and the democratic will of the people has been ignored.

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